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Training Programmes
CSIR-NML Professional Training  Calendar for 2017-18     
 
         NML can organize customized training programmes in the following

SN

Title

1

Application of X-ray Fluorescence   Spectrometry for Chemical Analysis

2

Complexometric Analysis

3

Optical Emission Spectrometric Methods of Analysis

4

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopic (AAS) Methods of Chemical Analysis

5

Calibration, Confidence and Quality Assurance

6

Remaining Life Assessment of Engineering Components

7

Computational Methods in Metallurgy and Materials Science

8

Course on Corrosion Science and Engineering

9

Testing of Refractory Raw Materials and Products

10

Testing of Iron Making Raw Materials

11

 Mineral Processing: Theory and Practice

12

Training in Metallography and Microscopy

13

Metallurgical Failure Analysis

14

Creep Evaluation of Engineering Materials

15

Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Metallic Materials

16

Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep - Fatigue Interaction in Engineering Materials

17

Foundry, Forge and Heat Treatment

 

Limited Hostel facilities are available on request

[1] NML

Title

Application of X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry for Chemical Analysis

About The Programmew

X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF) has been developed as a powerful non-destructive technique of qualitative as well as quantitative chemical analysis of materials. As a nondestructive technique, it has the merit of analyzing noncorrosive metals or alloys, refractory materials and geological materials irrespective of their solubility in conventional wet chemical methods. Ease of sample preparation in a very short time has increased its popularity in the industrial production units. Chemical analysis by XRF technique requires superior level of skill in the optimization of instrument, choice of source, choice of detector, choice of crystals, standard preparation, sample preparation, calibration, corrective measures on signal, etc. The proposed training will give a better insight into the principles of XRF analysis, the problems in analysis and the remedial measures.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • The fundamental principles in X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry XRF3
  • Sample preparation of XRF analysis2
  • Analytical problems of XRF technique and remedial measures3
  • Recent trends in XRF and its application in instrumental analysis2.5
  • XRF techniques for the analysis of metallurgical samples2
  • XRF techniques for the analysis of geological samples2
  • Discussion2.5

Hands of Training

  • Instrumental aspects of XRF Fluorescence Spectrometer 2
  • Sample preparation for XRF analysis2.5
  • Analytical program for XRF instrument3
  • Calibration in XRF analysis3
  • Analysis by XRF2
  • Discussion2.5

 

[2] NML

Title

Complexometric Analysis

About the Programme

Chemical analysis for knowing the quantitative composition of a substance is considered important and essential for evaluation and characterization of raw materials and finished products. However, the classical wet chemical methods involving lengthy and time consuming steps of successive separations of groups by precipitation and re-precipitation cannot solve the purpose of quality control since the effectiveness of quality control is largely determined by the speed with which the determination of critical parameters, compositions and properties involving evaluation of raw materials and finished products are made. Attempts have therefore been constantly made for development of rapid and accurate methods of chemical analysis. The complexometric methods of analysis are very simple, rapid and accurate and have many potential applications in the analysis of ores, minerals, metals, alloys, ferro-alloys, refractory materials and ceramic products. Metallurgical, ferro-alloy, refractory and ceramic industries will be benefited by this training.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Chemical analysis of ferro-alloys1
  • Chemical analysis of ores and minerals1
  • Chemical analysis of alumino-silicate refractory materials 1

Hands on Training

  • Chemical analysis of ferro-alloys6
  • Chemical analysis of ores and minerals13
  • Chemical analysis of alumino-silicate refractory materials 13

 

[3] NML

Title

Optical Emission Spectrometric Methods of Analysis

About the Programme

Optical Emission Spectrometers (OES) are routinely used instrument in a quality control laboratory. This is a very powerful analytical technique that enjoys a broad dynamic analytical range making possible the analyses from trace to major level in a single calibration curve. Both spark as well as Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) excitation sources may be used. ICP technique may be carried out in both simultaneous and sequential modes, which make the analyses quick and spectral overlap free. The excitation temperature being very high, the chances of chemical interference is almost eliminated. The capital investment for this techniques is somewhat high. However, in a quality control laboratory, where the number of samples are large and where analyses are required fast, ICP OES is the ideal equipment. The same equipment may also be used for analyzing solid samples using spark as the excitation source.

The objective of this training programme will be to make the users thoroughly conversant with the theoretical and practical understandings of the ICP and spark techniques. The objective of this training programme will also be to train the users so that they are able to handle OES independently at their own workplace. Training on OES will be useful in the Quality Control (QC) laboratories of ferrous and nonferrous industries.

This training programme will be suitable for QC personnel in ferrous and nonferrous industries, research organizations and academic institutions.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Fundamentals of optical emission Spectrometry (OES)1
  • Basic instrumentation 1
  • Theoretical aspects of the technique 1
  • Sample preparation 1
  • Minerals, metals, soil, plants and vegetables
  • Method developments 1
  • Calibration, recalibiration, interference, correction
  • Analysis of low alloy and plain carbon steels1
  • Analysis of ores and minerals 1
  • Analysis of soils, plants and vegetables1
  • Statistical analysis 1
  • Conclusion 1

Hands on Training

  • Basic instrumentation 2
  • Sample preparation 8
  • Minerals, metals, soil, plants and vegetables
  • Method developments 4
  • Calibration, recalibiration, interference, correction
  • Analysis of low alloy and plain carbon steels4
  • Analysis of ores and minerals 4
  • Analysis of soils, plants and vegetables3

 

[4] NML

Title

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopic (AAS) Methods of Chemical Analysis

About the Programme

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopic (AAS) methods of chemical analysis for cations have become a very powerful tool in the hands of analytical chemists. AAS can be used to determine a host of metallic cations from trace to percentage level. The method offers very little chemical and spectral interference and information is available for chemical interference and their correction. Cookbook methods are available from the supplier or one may be developed by qualified chemists to suit the exact requirement of the user agency. AAS method is quick, does not require expensive reagents. Also, the cost of the equipment being relatively low, it may be maintained by a small scale industry or a low budget analytical laboratory.

The basic objective of this particular programme is to appraise the participants about the fundamentals of the instrument, the possible interferences and their corrections. The programme will also outline the precautions to be taken for the smooth and trouble free operation of the equipment.

This training will be suitable for all quality control laboratories in small-scale industries, research organizations and academic institutions, those require chemical analyses for metals and materials.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Fundamentals of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS)1
  • Basic instrumentation1
  • Theoretical aspects of the technique1
  • Sample preparation1
  • Minerals, metals, soil, plants and vegetables
  • Method developments: Calibration, recalibration, interference, correction1
  • Analysis of low alloy and plain carbon steels1
  • Analysis of ores and minerals 1
  • Analysis of soils, plants and vegetables1
  • Statistical analysis1
  • Conclusion1

Hands on Training

  • Basic instrumentation2
  • Sample Preparation8
  • Minerals, metals, soil, plants and vegetables
  • Method developments : Calibration, recalibration, interference, correction4
  • Analysis of low alloy and plain carbon steels4
  • Analysis of ores and minerals 4
  • Analysis of soils, plants and vegetables3

 

[5] NML

Title

Calibration, Confidence and Quality Assurance

About the Programme

With new concepts emerging due to global competition, the way the products are designed and fabricated has undergone a sea change. A company need not manufacture all components that go into the making their product. Procuring some of the components from other companies, who specialize in manufacturing them, is an attractive and cost-effective solution. So, accuracy and precision in measurements are no longer confined to the shop floor. They must now conform to International standards to win the confidence of customers. How confident are you that your methods and practices lead you to produce high quality stuff? In an era, where there is a constant, persistent effort and demand, to realize and ensure highest possible accuracy, how accurate are your measurements, and do they conform to National/International standards (ISO). An answer to some of these questions lies in getting your instruments calibrated. Calibration lead to quality assurance too.

This program addresses these issues and aims to provide a deep insight into what is calibration and how it builds up confidence in the measurements. The program is very useful for all managers/engineers in quality control, operations, metrology departments and also for those in mid-level management who strive for quality assurance.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

Measurement science and technology 1

Understanding the characteristics of instruments 1

Why calibration 1

Calibration of temperature sensors and indicators 1

Calibration of pressure instruments 1

Calibration of electrical sensors, transducers and indicators 1

Specimen inspection and calibration of dimension and load 1

Uncertainty in measurement and calibration 1

Confidence and quality assurance through calibration 1

Hands on Training No. of hours

Calibration of temperature sensors and indicators 3

Calibration of pressure instruments 3

Calibration of electrical sensors transducers and indicators 3

Calibration of mechanical instruments 3

Demonstration

Determination of measurement uncertainty 2

 

[6] NML

Title

Remaining Life Assessment of Engineering Components

About the Programme

Engineering components experience a variety of environmental conditions and stresses while in service. This introduces, with service exposure, a process of degeneration of the components that renders them unsafe after a period of time. The designer, by anticipating some of the service conditions, may be able to prescribe the component for a stipulated period of life. In real-life, however, a number of imponderables offset the calculations and shorten the life of components. It has often been found that the calculations coupled with the factor of safety, provide a very conservative estimate of component life. Whether it is retiring a component too early or too late, there is an economic penalty that may be quite high. Periodic evaluation of remaining lives of ageing components is possibly the best way to avoid premature failure and yet use the component till the very end of its useful life. In this programme, the fundamentals of remaining life assessment will be presented. The course content is ideal for practising engineers and professionals working in power plant, refineries, petrochemical industries and those engaged in maintenance of engineering components.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Remaining life assessment: An overview, Importance of RLA-highlighted with1

    specific examples.

  • Stress analysis & failure criteria why and how do materials fail? 2

    And how to determine stresses that lead to failure?

  • Evolutions of structural damages what are the changes in mechanical properties, 2

    component shape and microstructures due to service exposure?

    How these changes effect performance?

  • NDT for flow detection & material characterization. How to identify &2

    quantify these structural changes?

  • Behaviour of cracked bodiesHow the presence of crack leads to 2

stress concentrations? Factors affecting crack growth.

  • Design codes & practices Recommended procedures for 4

    Component Design & Testing. Elaboration on industry accepted standards.

Case studies

(a) Life assessment under fatigue

(b) Life assessment under creep

(c) Life assessment under environmental damage

(d) Life assessment of boilers, turbine blades etc.

Hands on Training

  • Stress analysis using finite element method1
  • Software for remaining life assessment(CLIP, RELIEF etc.)1
  • Fracture mechanics based life assessment1
  • Special NDT techniques for RLA1

[7] NML

Title

Computational Methods in Metallurgy and Materials Science

About the Programme

Metallurgy and materials science has come a long way from the empirical approach based on heuristics and rules of thumb and is fast maturing into an exact quantitative science. Development of mathematical methods and computational techniques and affordability of desktop computers have led to tremendous progress of computational materials science in the last couple of decades. Modern computational techniques allow practising engineers to analyze a metallurgical process and study materials behaviour using simple tools of computer aided design and simulation. In this programme, the fundamentals of the computational methods will be covered for solving problems of metallurgy and materials science for practising engineers and scientists in steel plants, power plants, chemical process plants, research and testing laboratories and so on. Much emphasis is laid on augmenting the mathematical concepts with case studies relevant to industrial design and analysis. Hands on demonstration-cum-training will be provided on few softwares developed at NML.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Introduction of computational materials science1
  • Fundamentals of matrix methods for algebraic equations2
  • Applications of matrix method for material and energy balance & process 2

    flow-sheeting

  • Fundamentals of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE)3
  • Application of ODE solvers to creep strainmodelling, diffusion, phase

    transformation etc.

  • Fundamentals of Partial Differential Equations (PDE)3
  • Application of PDE solvers to fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, 2

    stress analysis

  • Artificial intelligence techniques2

Some Case Studies

  • Heat and mass transfer in iron-making, steelmaking operations1
  • Material and energy balance for steelmaking operations1
  • Oxidation/carburization in boilers/ heatertubes of power plants 1

    and refineries

  • Creep strain modelling for life prediction of engineering components1
  • Stress analysis of engineering components for fracture and fatigue1

Hands on Training

  • Life assessment packages, finite element packages, computational fluid3

    dynamics packages at NML

     

     

[8] NML

Title

Practical Course on Corrosion Science and Engineering

About the Programme

Corrosion of metals has imposed a serious threat on industry, the society and the nation in terms of both money and manpower. General statistics reveals that overall cost due to corrosion of metals amounts to at least 2-4% of GNP. This loss not only included the cost of replacement of metals, but also the damage to products by contamination, shut down of production, loss of efficiency and in psychological factors associated with failure or explosion of equipments. This loss can be reduced effectively to the tune of 20-25% by the application of appropriate and upgraded knowledge of corrosion and corrosion control science. Present course is an attempt in this direction which includes the basics and applied aspects of diffraction forms of corrosion and introduces to the recent developments in corrosion science and engineering. Further, it includes corrosion inhibitors in general, metallic and organic coatings for corrosion protection. Emphasis on the metallurgical aspects of corrosion, coating and electroplating is given. This course covers the latest electrochemical methods for corrosion monitoring and evaluation.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Principles of electrochemical corrosion and basic metallurgical 2
  • consideration in corrosion control
  • Corrosion detection and corrosion control monitoring1
  • General techniques for corrosion measurement2
  • Corrosion control during transit and storage2
  • Various types of corrosion inhibitors2
  • Introduction to protective coatings2
  • Corrosion testing and evaluation1
  • Newer trends in coating practices2
  • Fundamentals of cathodic protection2

Hands on Training

  • Acid pickling and evaluation of corrosion inhibitors1
  • Potentiodynamic polarization and determination of corrosion rate2
  • Salt spray test, sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide gas1
  • Moisture condensation test1
  • Electrolytic cleaning, standard methods for sample preparation2
  • Coating thickness, zinc plating and electroless nickel plating2

Demonstration

  • Potentiodynamic polarization and determination of corrosion rate
  • Electrochemical impedance analysis.

[9] NML

Title

Testing of Refractory Raw Materials and Products

About the Programme

Refractories play a vital role in all the industrial furnaces involving high service temperatures. About 70% of refractories produced are used in Iron and Steel industry. The quality of refractories mainly depends on the purity of raw materials and improved processing/making technology. Today, synthetic refractory raw materials are also being used for making superior quality refractory products. In this programme, various types of tests for characterization of refractory raw materials and products will be discussed and demonstrated. The programme is aimed for engineers, scientists, supervisors engaged in laboratories, institutes and industries.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Refractory raw materials (Natural & Synthetic)2
  • Characterization of refractory raw materials2
  • Types of refractory products 2
  • Evaluation of refractory products(Physical, thermal, mechanical properties)2
  • Furnaces and temperature control devices2

Hands on Training

  • Thermal shock resistance4
  • Permanent Linear Change on Reheating (PLCR)4
  • Hot modulus of rupture4

Demonstration

  • DTA/TGA4
  • High temperature creep4

[10] NML

Title

Testing of Iron Making Raw Materials

About the Programme

Raw materials play an important role in blast furnace (BF) ironmaking. The characteristics of raw materials have greatly changed in past two or three decades. Normally iron ore, limestone and coke are used as raw materials. Now-a-days, however, pre-fluxed sinters and pellets, liquid and gaseous fuels have increasingly replaced the conventional ironmaking raw materials. The role of the preparation, properties, performance characteristics of raw materials on hot metal quality would be discussed in the programme.

The programme has been designed for engineers, scientists and supervisors engaged in blast furnace operation, raw material preparation and characterization etc.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • BF operation, raw materials and properties2
  • Characteristics of iron ore2
  • Testing of ores, sinters and pellets2
  • Factors affecting performance of raw materials2
  • Fuels and fluxes2

Hands on Training

  • Chemical analysis of ore4
  • Thermal and reduction -degradation index4
  • Reducibility4
  • Softening of iron ore/sinters4
  • Testing of BF fuels and fluxes4

[11] NML

Title

Unit Operations in Mineral Processing: Theory and Practice

About the Programme

Mineral processing plays a vital role in exploitation of natural ore resources. It is a basic step in the field of metallurgy and is being practised by small and large mineral based industries. It involves a number of unit operations ranging from communition to dewatering. A basic understanding of various unit operations is considered to be useful for the efficient operation of mineral processing plant. This course is intended to impart the knowledge on the basic principles of various unit operations of mineral processing. This will also cover development in this area through lectures followed by hands on training/demonstration in selected equipment. This programme also envisages visit to other related R&D facilities existing in the laboratory. This course will be suitable for plant operators/foremen/technicians and other people connected with mineral processing activities.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Introduction to mineralogy1.5
  • Comminution1.5
  • Classification of minerals1.5
  • Gravity separation techniques1.5
  • Gravity separation of fine materials1.5
  • Flotation fundamentals1.5
  • Flotation-case studies2
  • Magnetic & electrostatic separation techniques2
  • Dewatering practice2

Hands on Training

  • Jaw crusher, roll crusher, ball/rod mill3
  • Hydrocyclone3
  • Jigs, Wilfley table3
  • Flotation & magnetic separation3
  • Multigravity separator3

 

[12] NML

Title

Training in Metallography and Microscopy

About the Programme

Microstructure of a material is the "window" through which one can understand the past, present and the future behaviour of a material. It is a must for any quality assurance programme, that includes the whole gamut of activities such as design, procurement of material, fabrication, operation, maintenance and in-service inspection.

Though many of the industrials requirements of microscopy can be met by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has now become more common than what it was a few years back. OM and SEM have their own advantages. SEM can give much higher magnification than OM. It can also have the advantage of the use of Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX) by which microanalysis of individual particles can be done. Thirdly, SEM has the advantage of a large depth of focus. However, while this is a great advantage in fractography (examination of fracture surfaces), sometimes it gives a problem while examining a microstructure at the interfaces. Therefore, if the needed maximum magnification is about 500-1000, OM is often better than SEM.

In view of the inherent importance, both OM and SEM would be covered for characterization of materials.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Microstructural analysis-why is it needed? Some of the material properties 2

    that are affected by microstructure

  • Metallographic specimen preparation mechanical grinding, mechanical 2

    polishing, electrochemical polishing, chemical etching, electrochemical etching

  • Construction of microscope, concept of numerical aperture, resolution, contrast1

    and calibration of microscope

  • Science and technology of development of and printing of film1
  • Digital photography, microscopy and other imaging1
  • Quantitative image analysis1
  • Inclusions-their origin, role in the behaviour of materials, and rating1
  • Scanning Electron Microscope - its constructionand possibilities. 1
  • Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray(EDAX)1
  • Fractography1

Hands on training

  • Metallographic sample preparation (optional) including chemical and 4
  • electrochemical etching
  • Coating for SEM sample2
  • Microstructural analysis on carbon steel, differently heat treated alloy3

    steels, nickel base alloys, aluminium alloys and cast iron

  • Inclusion rating by normal optical microscope and microscope with the 2

    facility of quantitative image analysis

  • Examination by SEM (and EDAX) on selected steels and alloys3
  • Fractography by SEM3

[13] NML

Title

Metallurgical Failure Analysis

About the Programme

The training module aims to integrate mechanical design, manufacturing processes, mechanical behaviour and microstructural analysis. In the interactive and modular course, the participants learn to determine the root causes of metallurgical failures. The participants are explained how to perform nondestructive, mechanical, metallurgical, and chemical tests by both portable and laboratory metallographic techniques. Optical and scanning electron micrographs and fractographs will be studied. The multi disciplinary nature of failure analysis benefits participants by integrating many subjects and requiring the use of modern equipments.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Failure analysis-general discussion1
  • Techniques-optical microscopy [laboratory and in-situ], electron 4

    microscopy including fractography, nondestructive testing, corrosion

    testing and mech anical testing

  • Residual stress - its effect on failures and measurement1
  • FEM analysis1
  • Fracture mechanics concepts1
  • Ductile fracture1.5
  • Brittle fracture1.5
  • Fatigue crack initiation, growth and fracture2
  • Wear1
  • Corrosion1
  • Elevated temperature failures1

Hands on Training

  • Optical microscopy of steel, brass,aluminium, nickel base alloys2
  • Fractography using scanning electron microscopy, and 3

    chemical analysis using energy dispersive analysis of X-rays

  • Nondestructive Test (ultrasonic for flaw detection, X-ray diffraction 3

    for residual stress measurement)

  • Mechanical test (Tensile, Fatigue,Hardness, Impact)4

[14] NML

Title

Creep Evaluation of Engineering Materials

About the programme

Creep is a special kind of plastic deformation in which strain increases slowly and continuously at a constant load (below yield point) and elevated temperature. It is the most important damage, which limits the lives of high temperature components operating in thermal power plants, petrochemical and fertilizer plants. Some popular grades of creep resistant steels used in these plants are 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo, 1Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, 12Cr-Mo-V etc. These steels in operation under creep conditions are characterized by their long-term creep rupture strength in contrast to short-term tensile strength at the operating temperature. Hence, determination of creep rupture properties of engineering materials are of great industrial relevance from the view point of ensuring smooth operation of the plant and extended life of the components. Keeping this in view, this training module is designed to suit the needs of the people engaged in research and development, creep life assessment and database development of engineering materials, quality control and assurance, component design and maintenance activities. This program includes lecture, hands-on training on creep and stress rupture test and data analysis to develop database on creep of engineering materials. Lecture from experts would cover various practical aspects to answer some important questions.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Introduction to creep and stress rupture tests1
  • Creep testing machines - specifications1
  • Creep testing machines - calibration1
  • Materials for high temperature services1
  • Effectiveness of time - temperature parameters1
  • Creep rupture tests for life assessment1
  • Creep rupture data analysis1
  • Factors influencing creep rupture strength1
  • Creep life assessment of main steam pipes1
  • Influence of wall thinning on creep life1
  • Creep life assessment of boiler tubes2
  • Creep life assessment of reformer tubes2

Hands-on Training

  • Application of computer software CLIP for creep life prediction2
  • Creep of thick pressurized tubes3

Demonstration

Laboratory demonstration on creep and stress rupture testing methodology using (i) Single specimen creep testing machines with three-zone controlled high temperature furnaces, thermocouples, LVDTs, (ii) Data logging system for monitoring and controlling temperature and creep strain data and standard test specimens based on national and international standards.

No. of hours : 2

[15] NML

Title

Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Metallic Materials

About the programme

Engineering fracture mechanics enables one to evaluate the behaviour of structures / components containing flaws. Fracture mechanics is a tool to assess the stress distribution in the vicinity of the cracks, since the conventional tensile properties, buckling stress etc., fail to characterize the stress situation around flaw like defects. The stress amplitude at the crack tip is denoted as K, Stress Intensity Factor (SIF), and can be experimentally evaluated. For the materials, which fail predominantly in elastic loading regime, the critical SIF is a material property and is denoted as Kic. The advent of high toughness material which could contain some plasticity before failing in an unstable manner, an energy based parameter, J integral, has been proposed. Similar to Kic, Jic is also a material property that can be determined in a laboratory by testing standard specimens.

The significance of these properties can be gauged from the fact that organizations, world over, responsible for maintaining the standards e.g., ASTM, BS, JIS, have incorporated methodologies for evaluation of fracture toughness in their respective standards. Of late, specifications for alloys employed in aircraft; space and nuclear industries are including the fracture toughness along with strength properties. Availability of reliable fracture toughness data will provide a basis for determining critical flaw size/design stress for safe-life/fail-safe designs.

This training module envisages imparting the techniques and procedures to be followed for determining the fracture toughness values of metallic materials based on International standards viz. ASTM, BS. Hands-on laboratory training is the focus of this module. This program is designed to suit the needs of the people engaged in research and development related to remaining life assessment / structural integrity evaluation, quality assurance, design / maintenance activities and also provides a platform to share the experiences of the users who are already familiar with FM test techniques.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Introduction1
  • Applications1
  • Test procedures1
  • Data analysis1

Hands-on Training

  • Specimen inspection1
  • Fatigue pre-cracking3
  • Test for Kic2
  • Test for Jic5
  • CTOD evaluation1

Demonstration

The training would include some of the basics like specimen inspection, operation of the loading machine and setting-up a test. Fatigue pre-cracking of the test specimens, which is mandatory for FT evaluation, would also be demonstrated. The testing procedures will be followed by data analysis; both by graphical methods as well as digital data processing techniques and culminate in validation of the test results.

[16] NML

Title

Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep - Fatigue Interaction in Engineering Materials

About the programme

Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) is an important consideration in the design and operation of components of aircraft, automotive and thermal power generating systems operating at high temperatures. These components experience cyclic loading and thermal stress arising from heating and cooling during start-up and shutdowns or during thermal transients, which give rise to low cycle fatigue damage. Low cycle fatigue under start-up and shutdowns occurs under essentially strain controlled conditions as the surface region is constrained by the bulk of the component. Steady load period during operation at high temperatures introduces creep damage in the component materials. Hence, power plant components have to be designed for fatigue, creep and its interaction effects.

This training program is designed to suit the needs of the people engaged in design, quality control and materials development activities.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Testing methodology1
  • Machine specification and operation 1
  • Factors influencing LCF behaviour1
  • Data compilation and analysis2
  • LCF life prediction methodologies2

Hands-on Training

  • Machine setup 0.5
  • Extensometer and thermocouples0.5
  • Parameters setup0.5
  • Data logging software0.5
  • Demonstration testing8.0

Demonstration

  • LCF Testing of a Specimen

[17] NML

Title

Foundry, Forge and Heat Treatment

About the Programme

The art of metal founding is the oldest metal forming process, which requires achievement of melt specification and appropriate moulding. To ensure casting soundness, moulding materials and methodology have considerable role to play.

The programme, thus, envisages to deliberate on sand characterization and control, testing of sands and analysis of defects arising from improper moulding practice. Hands on training are also designed to match with the theme of deliberations. The concept of forging practice as other method of metal forming process and heat treatment schedule for the product are also to be discussed in respect of quality attainment. The course shall be designed for practising foundrymen to update skill, improving productivity and imparting knowledge in their respective field of operations.

Topics of Lecture No. of hours

  • Sand characterization and control1.5
  • Moulding materials and methods1.5
  • Casting defects and remedies1.5
  • Forging practices1.5
  • Heat treatment principles and procedures1.5

Hands on Training

  • Testing and characterization of sand2.5
  • Moulding practice5
  • Forging practice2.5
  • Heat treatment practice2.5

 

 
Facilities Available